You say tomato I say Greek Salad please!

I love Greek food, probably more than any food I have ever had anywhere. Perhaps it is because my first visit to Greece was the first time I had ever really found out what a tomato should could taste like.Tomatoes at Rethymnon market

English tomatoes never taste the same, however we do have a habit of storing them in the fridge and I was told, in St Kilda at a farmers market, that is the quick way to killing the flavour. And I think we also over water them here, I have watched Greeks just splash some water on their plants in the morning and that is it. And this is what they grow.

Of course, you never forget your first moussaka, do you.Moussaka

Although the one I had in Heraklion, or the stuffed vegetables that Phil and I ordered with it, didn’t forget us for a couple of days.SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

The only bout of food poisoning we had and not too severe, thank goodness. I will avoid Pantheon in Heraklion in future.

With raw ingredients like this it is really hard not to produce good food.

We had a Greek Salad with almost every meal. It is obligatory really. I hate olives but Phil loves them so they get pushed to his side of the plate. Yet I will pour a gallon of olive oil over the tomatoes then use the bread to soak up any excess.DSCN0840

Then there is souvlaki.This was my first meal in Santorini at Fanari, in Fira.Souvlaki

And meat balls. Phil chose these in Heraklion at Kastella and at Fanari.

Flavoured with a herb we could never quite put a name to. We were told it was mint but think it was this. Do you know what it it?SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

Cant’t decide? Have a meze.Meze

This was the offer at Palazzo in Rethymnon. (It doesn’t get great reveiws here, yet we enjoyed our lunch).

Meat lover? A mixed grill to share?

Mega Mixed grillThis one from Byzantino in Plaka Athens was lovely, we spent 3 hours people watching while wading through it. We really struggled to eat later that night. Indeed we didn’t, just water and a coke for supper.

Deep fried courgettes.

Deep fried courgettesIf you are Heraklion these from Kastella overlooking the beach are to die for.

Really what is not to like? And if you only fancy a light snack there are plenty of shops and street vendors selling pasties and cakes.Greek pastry shop

And when you can’t eat any more, this comes out, with Raki, on the house.

PancakesOh, I will make room for that!

And if you stay at Nectarios Villas at Easter, you may get some of these.

 
SAM_1293

Do you love Greek food?

What is you favourite food in the world?

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Europe, Food, Greece, Travel and tagged , , , , by Travelling Coral. Bookmark the permalink.

About Travelling Coral

I started blogging in 2011 to record some of the highlights of the round the world trip I made with my husband Phil. On the 5 month trip we visited California, New Zealand, Australia, Fiji, Malaysia and Thailand. We met some fantastic people, saw amazing things and ate some lovely food. Yet while enjoying these new experiences I became acutely aware of the inequality in both first and third world countries. The gap between the rich and the poor on the streets of LA and KL was the same. On my return home, I realised that this inequality existed in the UK. I had to leave the country to see it for what it was. Food banks were opening in every town and city. I read the now famous blog, A Girl Called Jack and got more interested in how food poverty impacts the lives of so many people in my home country. And I got angry. And wanted to do something about it. Now, I work for Smethwick CAN, a charity bringing people together to tackle poverty, increase aspiration, provide opportunity and support the most vulnerable. One of the projects is a foodbank. Food poverty is shocking in any country, yet over a third of edible food still ends up in landfill. No one should go hungry, yet children are going to school without breakfast. Parents are skipping meals to feed their children. Foodbanks are a sticking plaster not a cure for food poverty. So, in addition to working for a charity that is supporting people in crisis, I volunteer for The Real Junk Food Project. They intercept food that would normally be thrown away, and cook it and serve it in a Pay as You Feel Cafe. I am still adjusting to life back at home in Birmingham, England, I have terminal Farsickness. To keep it at bay, I drag my husband and sometimes the son on shorter trips both in the UK and overseas. I now post random stuff that interests me. This includes travel, food and well being. The writing keeps me sane. Long term travelling is my goal.

7 thoughts on “You say tomato I say Greek Salad please!

  1. I love Greek food, too. Every part of Greece has special dishes. Olive oil is so healthy and I love the Greek tomatoes, too, because they have grown in the sun and that’s the reason, why they are so sweet and good. But many countries have good foods. I cook international: Greek, Italian, German, Indian, Chinese, Japanese etc.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s